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International Political economy: Globalization and political backlash

Schedule

January 2021 to February 2021
Total hours: 20
Hours of lectures: 20

Examination procedure

  • Written test
  • oral exam

Prerequisites

Optional for the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students of the PhD Programme in "Political Science and Sociology"

Optional for the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students of the PhD Programme in "Transnational Governance"

Optional for the 4th and 5th year students of the MA Programme in "Political and Social Sciences"

Syllabus

Overview

The recent Covid-19 pandemic has raised the question whether the world is witnessing to the retreat from global economic integration. Global supply chains have been disrupted. National security and public health concerns are providing powerful arguments in favour of protectionism. Inequality and political developments also challenge globalization as we used to think about it. The course will examine the debate on globalisation, its rise and the potential sources of its demise. It will discuss cross-cutting issues such as: technological changes, global production, anti-globalisation voting, economic interdependence, and the balance between states and the markets. 

Class format

The course is articulated into seminar meetings. For each of the meeting, students are required to adopt a pro-active stance based on the readings that will be circulated in advance. In particular, students are expected to critically reflect on the assigned readings, discuss about findings, and draw broader implications. Further details on class format and expectations will be provided during the first meeting. 

Assessment

Final grades will reflect participation and performance in seminar discussions as well as written work.

(1) Class participation (60%): Participation grade will take into account the quality of contribution to discussions as well as the intensity and engagement in collective reflections.

(2) Presentation (20%): Final grade will take into account the quality of the discussion of the assigned readings, in terms of clarity and critical engagement 

(3) Essay (20%): Each student will be required to write a short critical review (max 1,000 words) of one of the assigned reading. 

Educational Goals

The course is meant to give students a solid background to navigate contemporary debates about global economic integration and the retreat from it. One of the major objectives of the course is to provide students with the knowledge necessary to critically assess policy initiatives and solutions to manage globalization and its political and social consequences.