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Temporalities of Collective Action

Periodo di svolgimento

da Giovedì, 11 Febbraio 2021 a Venerdì, 12 Marzo 2021
Ore del corso: 20
Ore dei docenti responsabili: 20

Modalità d'esame

  • Relazione o seminario

Prerequisiti

Optional for the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students of the PhD Programme in "Political Science and Sociology"

Optional for the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students of the PhD Programme in "Transnational Governance"

Optional for the 4th and 5th year students of the MA Programme in "Political and Social Sciences"

Programma

Ritual, eventful, exceptional: the conceptualisation and symbolic articulation of time is central in the development and in the study of collective action. Collective action cannot be analysed only at a certain moment in the present and is often understood as constituting sequences, such as in the concepts of “cycle of protest” and “wave of mobilisation”. Social movement studies have been referring for a long time to the fact that social actors engage with time in different ways, such as in the analyses of the ritualistic nature of the repertoire of contention (Tilly), of the role of events and critical junctures (della Porta), of latency and abeyance (Melucci), of the narrative construction of spontaneity (Polletta), and so on. Furthermore, analyses of the role of time in shaping collective action have been characterising fields like social history (Thompson) or works at the crossroads between history and social science (Sewell) for decades.

Memory, rituality, millenarianism: the course aims at analysing these issues, addressing the temporalities of collective action from different points of view and drawing on different literature, providing both readings that draw on this multidisciplinary tradition and examples rooted in contemporary collective action.

Obiettivi formativi

Ritual, eventful, exceptional: the conceptualisation and symbolic articulation of time is central in the development and in the study of collective action. Collective action cannot be analysed only at a certain moment in the present and is often understood as constituting sequences, such as in the concepts of “cycle of protest” and “wave of mobilisation”. Social movement studies have been referring for a long time to the fact that social actors engage with time in different ways, such as in the analyses of the ritualistic nature of the repertoire of contention (Tilly), of the role of events and critical junctures (della Porta), of latency and abeyance (Melucci), of the narrative construction of spontaneity (Polletta), and so on. Furthermore, analyses of the role of time in shaping collective action have been characterising fields like social history (Thompson) or works at the crossroads between history and social science (Sewell) for decades.

Memory, rituality, millenarianism: the course aims at analysing these issues, addressing the temporalities of collective action from different points of view and drawing on different literature, providing both readings that draw on this multidisciplinary tradition and examples rooted in contemporary collective action.