EU Integration Theories

Periodo di svolgimento
Ore del corso
20
Ore dei docenti responsabili
20
Ore di didattica integrativa
0
‌‌

Modalità esame

Prova scritta e orale

Prerequisiti

Compulsory for the 1st year students of the PhD Programme in "Transnational Governance"

Optional for the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year students of the PhD Programme in "Political Science and Sociology"

Optional for the 4th and 5th year students of the MA Programme in "Political and Social Sciences"

Programma

The course introduces students to the main theories of European integration and applies them to the “polycrisis” of the EU (from the economic and financial crisis to the pandemic crisis, through the migration and the Brexit crises). The course consists of two parts:

Part I critically discusses the EU grand theories and introduces the key concepts and scholarly contributions;

Part II builds on the same theoretical approaches presented in the first part of the course applying them to the recent last EU crises, including the COVID-19 pandemic

Session N.1 (Fri, April 8 14.30-16.30)

Introduction to the module and European integration theories (2 hours)

Required readings:

Wiener, A., Borzel T. & T. Risse (2018) (eds.), European Integration Theory, Oxford, OUP, chapter 1

Saurugger S. (2013), Theoretical approaches to European Integration, London, Palgrave, chapter 1

Session N.2 (Tue, April 19, 10-13)

Intergovernmentalism and new-intergovernmentalism (3 hours)

Required readings:

A.Wiener, T. Borzel, T. Risse (2018) (eds.), European Integration Theory, Oxford, OUP, chapter 4.

S. Saurugger (2013), Theoretical approaches to European Integration, London, Palgrave, chapter 3

Bickerton, C. J.; Hodson, D. & Puetter U. (2015), The New Intergovernmentalism: European Integration in the Post-Maastricht Era, Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 53, No. 4, pp. 703–722.

Session N.3 (Tue, April 26, 14-17)

Neo-functionalism and post-functionalism (3 hours)

Hooghe, L. & G. Marks (2009). A Postfunctionalist Theory of European Integration: From Permissive Consensus to Constraining Dissensus, British Journal of Political Science. 39:1, 1-23.

Webber, D. (2019). Trends in European political (dis)integration. An analysis of postfunctionalist and other explanations. Journal of European Public Policy, Vol.26, No 8, 2019, pp. 1134-1152.

Wiener, A., Borzel T. & T. Risse (2018) (eds.), European Integration Theory, Oxford, OUP, chapter 3

Session N.4 (Fri, April 29, 14-17)

Neo-Institutionalism and the role of ideas and discourses (3 hours)

Required readings

S. Saurugger (2013), Theoretical approaches to European Integration, London, Palgrave, chapter 4.

A.Wiener, T. Borzel, T. Risse (2018) (eds.), European Integration Theory, Oxford, OUP, chapter 8.

A. Wiener and T. Diez (2009) (eds.), European Integration Theory, Oxford, OUP, chapter 7.

Session N.5 (Fri, May 6, 14-17)

Governance perspective (3 hours)

Required readings

A.Wiener, T. Borzel, T. Risse (2018) (eds.), European Integration Theory, Oxford, OUP, chapter 5.

S. Saurugger (2013), Theoretical approaches to European Integration, London, Palgrave, chapter 5

P.R. Graziano and C. Halpern (2015), “EU governance in times of crisis: Inclusiveness and effectiveness beyond the ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ law divide”, Comparative European Politics.

 PART II

Session N.6 [PRESENTATIONS] (Fri, May 13, 10-13)

EU Crises through the lenses of (New)-Intergovernmentalism and (post-) functionalism (3 hours)

Required readings

 On intergovernmentalism:

Fabbrini, S. (2013). Intergovernmentalism and Its limits. Comparative Political Studies46(9), 1003–1029.

Bressanelli, E. & N. Chelotti (2016), The Shadow of the European Council. Understanding Legislation on Economic Governance. Journal of European Integration. Vol. 38, No. 5, pp. 511-525.

Schimmelfennig, F. (2018). Liberal Intergovernmentalism and the Euro Area Crisis. Journal of European Public Policy. 22(2), 177-95.

On postfunctionalism:

Bressanelli, E., Koop, C. & C. Reh (eds) (2020). EU Actors under Domestic Pressure: Politicisation and De-Politicisation as Strategic Responses. Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 27, No. 3, pp. 329-41

Börzel T. A. & T. Risse (2018) From the euro to the Schengen crises: European integration theories, politicization, and identity politics, Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 25, No. 1, pp. 83-108

Schimmelfenning, F. (2018). Brexit: Differentiated Disintegration in the European Union. Journal of European Public Policy. Vol. 8, No. 25, pp. 1154-1173.

Session N.7 [PRESENTATIONS] (Fri, May 20, 10-13)

EU Crises through the lenses of Neo-institutionalism and governance perspectives (3 hours)

Required readings

On neo-institutionalism:

V. Schmidt, (2016), Reinterpreting the rules ‘by stealth’ in times of crisis: a discursive institutionalist analysis of the European Central Bank and the European Commission, West European Politics, DOI: 10.1080/01402382.2016.1186389

G. Falkner (2016), EU’s problem-solving capacity and legitimacy in a crisis context: a virtuous or vicious circle?, West European Politics, 2016, 39/5, 953-970.

S. Ladi & D. Tsarouhas (2020) EU economic governance and Covid-19: policy learning and windows of opportunity, Journal of European Integration, 42:8, 1041-1056.

On governance:

J. Zeitlin & B. Vanhercke (2018): Socializing the European Semester: EU social and economic policy co-ordination in crisis and beyond, Journal of European Public Policy, DOI: 10.1080/13501763.2017.1363269

P. Copeland, P.; M. Daly (2018). The European Semester and EU Social Policy. JCMS: Journal of Common Market Studies56(5), 1001–1018.

Pochet, P. (2020) ‘Twenty Years of the Publication “Social Policy in the European Union”: What Have We Learned?’, in Vanhercke, B., Ghailani, D., Spasova, S., Pochet, P. (eds) Social Policy in the European Union 1999–2019: The Long and Winding Road, pp.13–35. Brussels, Belgium: ETUI (European Trade Union Institute for Research).

 

Obiettivi formativi

At the end of the course students are expected to critically understand the main theories of European integration and apply them to recent developments in, and crises of, integration. Students should be able to figure out the drivers of integration and understand the institutional features of the EU, developing a deep understanding of the different positions in the literature. They are also expected to know the key aspects of the EU economic and social governance and institutional architecture of the EU.